Ambassador Carly Wallace: A Life Changing Life Campaign



Carly Wallace is a Dulguburra Yidinji woman and campaign ambassador for the new Department of Social Services campaign to get more mob into the Care and Support Workforce. She is sharing her story from being an unpaid carer, to working into youth support to now being the Senior Disability Royal Commission Senior Advocate and reflecting on why she thinks it is important for mob to be in this sector, especially for the quality of care for mob who need care and support.


A Life Changing Life campaign has been developed by the Department of Social Services, in collaboration with the Department of Health and the Department of VETARIN’S Veterans’ Affairs. It was developed after research with potential workers, current care and support workers, employers and stakeholders, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and people with disability, older people and veterans. It aims to raise awareness of the job opportunities in the sector and encourage potential workers to apply for these roles. The Australian Government’s A Life Changing Life campaign shares the stories of the rewarding relationships to: • increase community knowledge about the wide range of jobs and career options in the sector • increase understanding of what the work involves • show the value and benefits of the work, and • overturn outdated ideas about care and support.



The campaign features real people — care and support workers, and the people they support. It aims to raise awareness of the job opportunities in the sector and encourage potential workers to apply for these roles. Through the campaign and other actions, the goal is to attract around 140,000 people to the care and support sector by 2024. Potential workers (the campaign’s primary audiences) include: • tertiary students studying related fields • young people who are looking for meaningful work • job seekers who are interested in this sector • people returning to the workforce, including carers • professionals who could transfer their skills to the sector • recent arrivals to Australia • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people • people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds.



For more information, visit careandsupportjobs.gov.au