Proud Kamilaroi woman Haidee Allan from Tamworth NSW on the Big Brekky Show


Proud Kamilaroi woman Haidee Allan from Tamworth NSW is working at the ABS, and part of the team delivering the 2021 Census campaign. “Our campaign shares stories of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations that have used the Census to help plan for our future generations,” Haidee said. “From a remote bus service in Queensland to better university pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth, the campaign is helping us to share powerful stories about how Census data is used to create better outcomes in community.” Haidee returns to 3KND this morning to update us on the Census 2021 and what you need to do. That’s around 8.30am

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) launched the 2021 Census campaign, with national advertising to start on Sunday 4 July.

The 2021 Census campaign will include materials and resources to encourage all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to complete the Census this August. Radio advertising will be translated into 19 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages. “From a remote bus service in Queensland to better university pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth, the campaign is helping us to share powerful stories about how Census data is used to create better outcomes in community.” This year, the ABS is encouraging people to start their Census as soon as they receive instructions if they know where they’ll be on Tuesday 10 August. In remote areas, the Census is conducted between July and August. This allows time for remote teams to cover large areas and visit every household to help people complete.

“Our network of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff across Australia will be working closely within their own communities. We recognise their understanding of the language is important for helping our mob to be included in the Census,” Haidee said. There are many resources available to help people participate. They are available at www.census.abs.gov.au/indigenous The materials and resources feature the artwork ‘Our Story. Our Future.’ which was created by proud Wiradjuri, Wotjobaluk, Yuin and Gumbaynggirr artist Luke Penrith and Badu Island artist from the Torres Strait Naseli Tamwoy. The artwork tells the story of how the ABS works with communities to see, hear and acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, cultures and experiences in our national story.


“Our voices are stronger and louder together. Encouraging our mob to be counted in the Census ensures we’re heard. “I encourage everyone to participate in the 2021 Census and help tell our story,” Haidee said.


Why is the Census so important? If you’re too young to remember your parents filling out the last Census and aren’t sure what it’s all about, it’s essentially a giant survey of every Aussie in every household around Australia. The Census asks questions like your age, country of birth, ancestry, religion, language used at home, education and even work.



It’s really important that everyone in your household completes the Census ‘cos it helps the federal government figure out how they’re going to spend taxpayer dollars. To the everyday person the Census seems like a lot of really interesting numbers and statistics on the Aussie public, but to the government and other organisations it’s super important for our future.


The Census also helps governments, businesses and non-for-profits across the country make important decisions about planning, healthcare, infrastructure, transport and education. It also helps inform much needed services that improve or assist the lives of millions of people, families and communities. This year in particular, the data from the Census will provide valuable insights on how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the lives of Australians—so it’s very important. When is the Census this year?

This year the Census is scheduled for Tuesday, 10 August 2021, but you can complete the online version of the survey as soon as you receive your instructions, which have already started arriving in some people’s letter boxes. If you fail to complete your Census after Census night your household will receive a reminder letter and then visits from Census staff. It’s also important to keep in mind that the Census is compulsory, so if you don’t complete the Census you (or your ‘rents) could wind up facing some hefty fines.

This is also the second time the Census will be conducted mostly online, so fingers crossed we don’t have another #CensusFail like we did in 2016 (touch wood).